First post: Question about traveler mod

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by David Brande, Jul 12, 2017.

  1. David Brande

    David Brande New Member

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    Hello,

    So glad to have found this forum. My wife and I just bought our first sailboat, a 1980 Omega 14 that had been garaged for a very long time in good condition. Just got it home and rigged it up for the first time and have ordered a few odds and ends for it: replacement blocks for the centerboard and traveler, a couple of new lines, QR pins, etc. Just enough to get us on the water.

    I'm wondering if anyone has gone to the trouble of mounting a cam cleat for one end of the traveler, to better control the draft in the mainsail. Or should I constrain the movement of the traveler block w/a loop or knots in the traveler? Or just leave it alone?

    I'm just thinking that a cam cleat might help with powering/depowering the main.

    Thanks!
    David
     
  2. woodbark

    woodbark Member

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    Hello David,

    Welcome to the forum! .... This bit of information on the subject is from the "Capri 14.2 Tuning Guide - Presented by Quantum Sails"

    TRAVELER - The goal is to rig the traveler so it enables the boom to be trimmed as close to center-line as is possible when sailing upwind. First restrict the traveler block's movement by tying it in the middle of the traveler. Next the traveler bridle height must be set correctly for every given wind strength. Ideally, the bridle will be high enough so when the main-sheet is trimmed correctly, the back boom blockwill be almost touching the traveler block. Since the main-sheet must be trimmed tighter as the wind increases, the traveler height must be reduced. An approximate light air traveler height is 28", which is measured from the top of the stern to the apex of the traveler bridle. You will need marks on the traveler tails so you will have consistent height settings for light, medium and heavy.
     
  3. David Brande

    David Brande New Member

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    Thank you!

    If I'm understanding this text, it would seem to argue for some way to handily adjust the length/height of the traveler line, such as a cam cleat. But is it suggesting tying a loop in the traveler line, to hold to the traveler block in the middle?
     
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  4. Al W

    Al W Member

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    Yes you have that correct. I leave my traveler line at one length 24" above transom. Not into racing, works great for day sailing getting good shape in the sail at all wind points.
     
  5. David Brande

    David Brande New Member

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    Super, thanks!
     
  6. woodbark

    woodbark Member

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    and regarding
    This one had me scratching my head when as well until I found out how the pros do it ; ' tie a simple knot in the traveler, on both sides of the block ..... to lock the block in place at the center of the traveler.
     
  7. c14_Jim

    c14_Jim Sailing on Shelter Bay

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    I did a considerable amount of thinking, calculations and measurements regarding the aerodynamic forces and the interaction of the sails on the Omega. But more importantly, I have experimented with different sail trim on the Omega especially on the wind with a fresh breeze. The first thing to take into consideration is that in the Omega is that the shroud limits the angle of incidence for the jib to 22.75 degrees by my calculations (ask if you want those calcs). That is pretty terrible compared to other boats. (Lido is 20 deg, other class boats range from 9 degrees to the FD at 18 degrees. My point (no pun intended) is that the Omega doesn't point well. It does foot well however. If I am trying to point as high as I think efficient in the Omega I bring in the jib until it almost touches the shroud, an inch or two away depending on the cut of your sail, and bring the boom aft end to half way between the corner where the transom meets the leeward side of the boat. I have experimented with bringing it closer to center without an improvement in VMG. You need to experiment with this by looking to see where and when the mainsail stalls and luffs but I don't think you will ever get the boom to center in the Omega like they do in other boats.
    Racing other boats in the Omega I have found that if my boat isn't doing well up wind I need to foot rather than point.
    "When in doubt, let it out." I'll try to add a photo showing the forces involved if I can figure out how to do that.
    BTW, the angle of incidence of the boom (not the mainsail a/c twist) is 6 degree when the boom is 11.25 inches off centerling; leeward of center about a foot.
     

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